Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Just ordered both #lovenotfear and Neurodivergent from Aromaleigh!

I am excited! Pretties! 

Now if only they’d do a color for ASAN as well… Is “Acceptance is an Action” too long a name? 

(links: #LoveNotFear and Neurodivergent)

Saturday, December 7, 2013

Someone just quoted Nelson Mandela to me as proof that Autistic Activists’ advocacy style is wrong,: “because we can only accomplish our cause successfully if we follow peace-activism like Mandela” (their words, not mine.)

Seriously. It’s troubling to see people already beginning their mystical-peace-love-cotton candy portrayal of Mandela. He deserves better.

Truth is, Mandela was a crusader and he was tough to the core. He was a true Activist. He didn’t have the attitude, “We should all get a long and only discuss what makes us happy.” Geewhiz NO. He didn’t spend decades in prison for selling peace-beads.

It would be nice if people would respect Mr. Mandela enough to learn the history of his Activism before they apply his quotes to their unbalanced view of reality. If you only think love and peace get the job done, and you’re using Mandela’s words to counter radical activism, then a reality check is in order.

Mr. Mandela knew what it was like to stand up in the face of all that is wrong, and even risk death for the greater good. In his trial, he freely admitted that he helped form the Umkhonto we Sizwe, as well as played a prominent role in all their affairs until his arrest. With a complete understanding that his admission to violence against the government could result in a death sentence, Mandela testified:

“All lawful modes of expressing opposition to this principle had been closed by legislation, and we were placed in a position in which we had either to accept a permanent state of inferiority, or to defy the Government. We chose to defy the law. We first broke the law in a way which avoided any recourse to violence; when this form was legislated against, and then the Government resorted to a show of force to crush opposition to its policies, only then did we decide to answer violence with violence.”

So, before quoting Mr. Mandela to me when you are attempting to make a point that you do not agree with Autistic/Disability Rights Activists advocacy-style, please take the time to understand why Nelson Mandela is a true hero to marginalized people.

And no, I’m not promoting violence in advocacy (in case anyone reads into the quote I used from Mandela) — simply showing the contrast in their mistaken views of his activism style.)

Same goes for Martin Luther King, Jr.

Six Things Nelson Mandela Believed That Most People Won’t Talk About: http://thinkprogress.org/home/2013/12/06/3030781/nelson-mandela-believed-people-wont-talk

Sharon DaVanport of AWN.

Six Things Nelson Mandela Believed That Most People Won’t Talk About

Friday, November 8, 2013

(Image description: a white graphic with a purple box with white letters angled at top left which says “Volunteer Wanted.” To the right of the purple box it says in all caps, “CONTACT INFO@AUTISMWOMENSNETWORK.ORG.”An arrow with dotted lines and a green triangle leads from the contact information to a paragraph in bold letters below which says, “Autism Women’s Network is looking for a volunteer who has HTML coding skills and is familiar with Facebook apps. If you or someone you know has these skills and is interested in a volunteer position with AWN, please send us an email!”The purple box with white letters (described above) has a dotted line and green triangle arrow leading down to another small box (white with purple letters.) Inside the box it says in all caps: “DO YOU KNOW FACEBOOK CODING? DO YOU KNOW HOW TO WORK WITH FACEBOOK APPS?”Directly below (bottom left) it says in bold font: “Please E-mail: info@autismwomensnetwork.orgFor more information on the Autism Women’s Network, visit www.autismwomensnetwork.orgOur org’s logo (red, pink and white dragonfly) with the letters “AWN is positioned in the bottom right corner of the image.)

I worked with AWN in the past! Let me know if you have some samples and maybe I can give a reference if you are interested!

(Image description: a white graphic with a purple box with white letters angled at top left which says “Volunteer Wanted.” 

To the right of the purple box it says in all caps, “CONTACT INFO@AUTISMWOMENSNETWORK.ORG.”

An arrow with dotted lines and a green triangle leads from the contact information to a paragraph in bold letters below which says, “Autism Women’s Network is looking for a volunteer who has HTML coding skills and is familiar with Facebook apps. If you or someone you know has these skills and is interested in a volunteer position with AWN, please send us an email!”

The purple box with white letters (described above) has a dotted line and green triangle arrow leading down to another small box (white with purple letters.) Inside the box it says in all caps: “DO YOU KNOW FACEBOOK CODING? DO YOU KNOW HOW TO WORK WITH FACEBOOK APPS?”

Directly below (bottom left) it says in bold font: “Please E-mail: info@autismwomensnetwork.org

For more information on the Autism Women’s Network, visit www.autismwomensnetwork.org

Our org’s logo (red, pink and white dragonfly) with the letters “AWN is positioned in the bottom right corner of the image.)

I worked with AWN in the past! Let me know if you have some samples and maybe I can give a reference if you are interested!

Friday, August 12, 2011

Sharon DaVanport of AWN is looking for some input.

In preparation for my upcoming talk on cyberbullying at AANE’s Fall Conference, I ‘d like your input on the following.

When  does freedom of speech cross over to cyberbullying?

What positive strategies have you used when encountering online bullying?

Parents/Teachers: Do your school districts have a cyberbullying policy or guidelines which they enforce?

Psychologists/Therapists: How serious can this kind of trauma be to individuals enduring online attacks?

Thank You!

[ if you prefer to contact me privately, my email is: sharon@autismwomensnetwork.org ]

Monday, August 1, 2011 Saturday, June 18, 2011

soilrockslove:

Genderbitch Lite: Now With More Rambling!: nicocoer: Pre-Employment Personality Tests and the Disability…

nicocoer:

Pre-Employment Personality Tests and the Disability Community

The office of Commissioner Felblum of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has scheduled a meeting with representatives from the disability and business communities to discuss the use of personality…

I had to help someone with one of these recently… they are bloody awful - long and mind-numbing.  They also use a lot of college-level words that I barely know.

They also are a barrier for people who have English as their second (or third) language.  They are an amalgam of (the above mentioned) college-level words and idioms and figures of speech.

static-nonsense:

nicocoer:

Pre-Employment Personality Tests and the Disability Community

The office of Commissioner Felblum of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has scheduled a meeting with representatives from the disability and business communities to discuss the use of personality tests as pre-employment screening tools. The Autism Women’s Network will be in attendance, represented by Lindsey Nebeker, AWN’s Washington DC Liaison. Lindsey would like to hear from anyone in the disability community about their personal experiences with these tests, especially in regards to any concerns you may have. Please email your replies to info@autismwomensnetwork.org no later than 3:00PM EDT on Monday June 20, 2011. Thank you for your input.

Please reblog! This is an important issue! Employment personality tests create barriers to employment for those with MH Disabilities and DDs.Note that she’s not just looking for autistic input- if you have a disability and have a comment on these “tests”, please let her know!

I personally have seen questions (when trying for employment, particularly at Staples or the like) that held a bias against those who have abused or a victim of violent crime. (Plus, I even failed *walmart*’s personality test somehow?)

oh god those tests i hate them so much. i have to lie in order to get past them, due to my mental disabilities - which is not something i should have to do. period.

christinathena:

nicocoer:

Pre-Employment Personality Tests and the Disability Community

The office of Commissioner Felblum of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has scheduled a meeting with representatives from the disability and business communities to discuss the use of personality tests as pre-employment screening tools. The Autism Women’s Network will be in attendance, represented by Lindsey Nebeker, AWN’s Washington DC Liaison. Lindsey would like to hear from anyone in the disability community about their personal experiences with these tests, especially in regards to any concerns you may have. Please email your replies to info@autismwomensnetwork.org no later than 3:00PM EDT on Monday June 20, 2011. Thank you for your input.

Please reblog! This is an important issue! Employment personality tests create barriers to employment for those with MH Disabilities and DDs.Note that she’s not just looking for autistic input- if you have a disability and have a comment on these “tests”, please let her know!

I personally have seen questions (when trying for employment, particularly at Staples or the like) that held a bias against those who have abused or a victim of violent crime. (Plus, I even failed *walmart*’s personality test somehow?)

Plus, honestly, a lot of them have confusingly-worded questions, and I have to guess at what their intended meaning is, so I’m not sure if I’m answering “correctly” or not.

Me too.

plures:

Christy: nicocoer: Pre-Employment Personality Tests and the Disability…

nicocoer:

Pre-Employment Personality Tests and the Disability Community

The office of Commissioner Felblum of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has scheduled a meeting with representatives from the disability and business communities to discuss the use of personality…

These questions are terrible for many autistics, mostly because they expect a certain type of social prediction that is much easier for non-autistic people to employ. I wish that these tests would be eliminated, and that interviews would focus as much on competency as much as they did on difficult-to-define NT social skills.

—Noël

Thursday, April 14, 2011

DRAFT: Gender statement

Below is the draft I came up with based on the feedback from my SOS post and some help from the trans* community, including eateroftrees. Please let me know if you have further feed back, and share so this gets out. I need to submit my final draft by Monday, April 18th 2011. Thanks again for all your feedback!

Statement on Gender
AWN both recognizes and affirms each individual’s gender identity. We will not tolerate abusive behavior based on perceived or actual gender identity and presentation. We recognize that gender is not a binary, and that one can identify with “woman” and a non-binary gender at the same time. We also recognize that some people may have a varying gender identity, and may identify as a woman at some times but not others. We would like to take this opportunity to welcome all women, and supporters of women, to join our community.
We wish to specifically welcome trans women, as well as non-binary and gender variant individuals who have claimed, in some way, the identity of woman or girl. While our leadership is exclusively those who identify as Autistic Women, we believe that you claim your identity, not that you are assigned it. We hope to provide the same support, networking, and community to those who have had to claim their identity as to those who haven’t.
We wish to recognize and affirm the experiences of those who do not identify as women currently but have in some way in the past. Too often, gender biases are based not on our identities but on how other people believe we should identify. We welcome the input of those who have been misgendered as women, and who feel that the ways they have been misgendered give them a common experience with girls or women.
We also welcome the support and community of those who do not and have never identified as women. AWN works to center the experiences of Autistic Women, and want our allies to support us in that work. We believe that community of choice is more important than being divisive, and hope that you feel safe and welcome in helping us build that, regardless of gender identity.
Sunday, April 10, 2011

A little SOS

I need to write a statement about accepting trans* folk for AWN. But I’m nervous about writing it. eep.

If you want to help, and have a non-cis gender ID, please email me savannah@autismwomensnetwork.org)  

Basically I want to make it so that it is clear we welcome trans women, non-binary folk who have some sort of connection to the ID of women, and those who have been the brunt of misogyny and/or who have had to deal with sterotypes of being a “girl” even if that wasn’t your ID (outcomes of being CAFAB).

But ahhhhh I am not sure how to do that and I’m all worried about wording it wrong and having people go o_0 at me or fucking it up.  Eep.

Help?